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Chives

Very easy to grow, chives are a member of the onion family and are used to flavor soups, potatoes, and eggs. The linear leaves should be trimmed when they reach 4 inches, and frequently afterward.

Start from seed or divide an existing clump and plant directly in soil.

 

Dill

Though short-lived, dill’s tangy leaves make it a good winter candidate. Plant the seeds thickly, about 20 per pot. Trim the entire plant once leaves reach 3 inches tall, and frequently thereafter. Toss at season’s end. Start from seed.

 

Lavender

Opt for Hidcote or Munstead varieties for easy growth, plus flowers and fragrance that last all winter long. Good drainage is essential; lavender is prone to root rot. Remove flowers as they fade. Start from crown division or buy a starter plant.

 

Mint

Choose a variety with a fragrance profile you prefer: peppermint, chocolate or even apple with its fuzzy, grayish leaves. Mint spreads abundantly outside, but works well in a container with regular trimming. Start from seed or cutting.

 

Oregano

Varieties of this hardy perennial like well-drained soil and low humidity. Snip sprigs when the plant grows several inches tall; keep trimming to promote growth. Plant from a crown division or starter plant.

 

Parsley

This is another plant that grows easily inside. Eating parsley aids digestion and reduces inflammation. Transplant it outside come spring, and you’ll attract swallowtail butterflies. Plant from seed.

 

Rosemary

Trim the leaves and flowering tops of this needled herb to flavor fish and meat or infuse aromatic oils and soaps. The Herb Society of America recommends cutting stems above any woody growth and avoiding dry, brown or yellowing leaves. Plant from cutting or seed.

 

Sage

This dense, hardy plant will come back year after year. Use green leaves in poultry dishes. Avoid cutting woody stems and remove flowers to encourage growth.

Plant from seed (a three-month process) or use a crown division.

 

Sweet basil (Genovese)

You can use the leaves and seeds of this leafy green often associated with Italian dishes. The Herb Society of America recommends pruning it when it has three to five sets of full-size leaves to maximize growth. Start from seed or cutting.

 

Thyme

Versions of this herb grow tall or spread wider to form a mat that “trails nicely” over a pot’s lip. Versions like lime, lemon, coconut or the more common Italian can perfume a room with just the touch of a hand. Crown division or buying a starter to transplant.

*The above tips are from KIMBERLY MARSELAS | LNP CORRESPONDENT*